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Jul222014

02:34:26 am

Poor Teens' Health May Benefit From Top Schools - Yahoo News








Study: Low-income teens' health may benefit from attending top schools - The Denver Post






The researchers compared behavior in almost 1,000 kids in 10th through 12th grade who were admitted to the high-performing schools and in those who went elsewhere. Overall, 36 percent of the selected kids engaged in at least one of 11 risky behaviors, compared with 42 percent of the other teens. The study doesn't prove that the schools made the difference and it has limitations that weaken the results, including a large number of students who refused to participate. Still, lead author Dr. Michael Wong said the results echo findings in less rigorously designed research and they fit with the assumption that "better education will lead to better health." Wong is an internist and researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study involved mostly Latino students who applied to one of three top-performing public charter schools from 2007 to 2010. About half of the kids had parents who didn't graduate from high school and most didn't own their own homes. Results were published online Monday in Pediatrics. Teens were given computerized questionnaires to answer in private, to improve the chances for accurate self-reporting. Standardized test scores were obtained from the California Department of Education.
http://news.yahoo.com/poor-teens-health-may-benefit-top-schools-062507644.html







Conemaugh Health System adds 2 specialists to staff
Local News
The Tribune Democrat, Johnstown, PA






Risky behavior including binge-drinking, unsafe sex and use of hard drugs was less common among these kids, compared with peers who went to mostly worse schools. The teens were otherwise similar, from low-income Los Angeles neighborhoods who applied to top public charter schools that admit students based on a lottery system. The researchers compared behavior in almost 1,000 students in 10th through 12th grade who were admitted to the high-performing schools and those who went elsewhere. Overall, 36 percent of the selected students engaged in at least one of 11 risky behaviors, compared with 42 percent of the other teens. The study doesn't prove that the schools made the difference. Still, lead author Dr. Michael Wong said the results echo findings in less rigorously designed research and fit with the assumption that "better education will lead to better health." Wong is an internist and researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles. Results were published online Monday in Pediatrics. The Associated Press
Study: Low-income teens' health may benefit from attending top schools - The Denver Post










Going through the wrist versus the groin cuts down on bleeding and complications, Penumetsa said. It is also more comfortable and convenient for patients as they do not have to lie still for four to six hours after the procedure. Penumetsas wife is a physician in Conemaugh Memorials internal medicine residency program. We are both very excited about being here and settling down with our family in this friendly community, Penumetsa said. Salins, who is board certified in neurology and psychiatry, said her own experiences directed her career. My mom had Parkinsons disease at a young age, she said. Growing up I saw firsthand the impact neurological diseases have http://alexsimring.wordpress.com/ on patients and their families.
http://www.tribune-democrat.com/local/x1027600863/Conemaugh-Health-System-adds-2-specialists-to-staff




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